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Cult of Power: The Inside Story of the Fight to Open Augusta National Golf Club and How it Exposed the Ingrained Corporate Sexism that Keeps Women Down-

  • Title: Cult of Power: The Inside Story of the Fight to Open Augusta National Golf Club and How it Exposed the Ingrained Corporate Sexism that Keeps Women Down
  • Author:
  • Released: 2013-02-22
  • Language:
  • Pages: 228
  • ISBN:
  • ISBN13:
  • ASIN: B00BJTGMJE

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From Publishers Weekly In 2002, Burk, chair of the National Council of Women's Organizations, led a protest against the Augusta National Golf Club—home of the Masters golf tournament—for its refusal to admit women to the club. In riveting prose, she tells that story and draws out lessons for eliminating sex discrimination in corporations generally. In her initial letter to chairman Hootie Johnson, Burk simply requests that he review the club's policies and open the membership to women; Johnson's reply to Burk vilifies her and calls her references to discrimination offensive. As her struggle with the club intensifies, Burk learns that several powerful corporate presidents are members of the club (she includes a complete list of the club's members) and uncovers countless anecdotes of daily discrimination against women at their companies. She calls for companies to do "gender equity audits" to uncover the real statistics about matters such as the number of layoffs by gender and job category, the number of new hires by gender, including pay averages, and number of new board members by gender. With a terrific story on which to hang her recommendations, Burk achieves a rare hybrid of activism and entertainment. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From In 2002 small headlines announced the fact that the Augusta National Golf Club, host of the Masters Tournament, did not allow women members. Attention to this situation escalated when Burk, chair of the National Council of Women's Organizations, wrote a polite "reconsider your policy, please" letter to chairman Hootie Johnson--and received a multipage press release in response. The fact is that women's status in American corporations today (especially timely in light of Carly Fiorina's ouster from HP) signifies that women are still second-class citizens in business. In between Burk's documenting the furor over Augusta, individual profiles of members, such as Sanford Weill, former Citigroup CEO, make an unassailable case for change in her prescriptions for corporations, from "corporate culture must be changed from the CEO down" to "stop giving 'too much for too little'--lauding companies who have a woman or two in top management." Barbara Jacobs
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